Samburu Kenya

Samburu is one of the historical destinations that anyone could visit and enjoy the various sceneries it carries. This is a vast land that stretches to the southeastern side of Lake Turkana and has had people occupying it for the last 400 years. The inhabitants are traditional nomads, who are related to the Maasai community in Kenya.

Samburu National Reserve

The Samburu National Reserve is a game reserve situated on the banks of the Kenyan Ewaso Ng’iro River. At an impressive size of 64 square miles, the reserve is known for being named after the Samburu people of Kenya as well as holding a robust number of rare wildlife and having an extremely vibrant ecosystem.

The reserve is especially famous for being the setting of Elsa the lioness, made famous in the award-winning movie Born Free. It is also known for containing such wildlife rarities as the long-necked gerenuk, reticulated giraffe, and beisa oryx.

This is rated as one of the best national parks in Kenya. The national reserve is found in the northern part of Mt. Kenya. When you are getting to the park, you will enjoy the drive from the foothills of Mt. Kenya. You will be treated to the unusual scenery of the green forest on one side and the desert landscape on the other side. There is a wide variety of animals that you will enjoy viewing in this park, including the big cats, zebras, gazelles, gerenuk, giraffes, guinea fowls and so many more.

Samburu Tribe

One of the other eye-catching sights to behold is the red-robbed Samburu tribesmen who bring the cattle down the river to drink water. These are pastoralists and their livelihood revolves around livestock. The animals are guarded by young men who are known as morans.

One of the famous safari destinations in East Africa.Samburu National reserve is

located North of Kenya and is a premier game reserve situated on the banks of

the Ewaso-nyiro river.

This vast park of remote pristine wilderness measure 165km square and boarders

the Ewaso-nyiro river to the south which separates it from the Bufallo springs

National reserve.

This is a unique haven for wildlife species including the Gravy Zebra,Somali

Ostrich,REticulated Giraffe,Gerenuk and Beisa Oryx.

The reseve is also home to over 900 Elephants,large predators such as the

Lions,Leopard and Cheeters..

(Kamunyak-the famous  lioness who adapted an ORYX CALF is a resident here)

Samburu National resesrve is the best location to sport a Leopard.

Wild Dogs are also  common here includig over 450 species of birds.

           NAIVASHA HELLS GATE AND FLOWER FARMS WALKING AND BIC TOUR

Where famous florists get their roses from to make those beautiful compositions? If talking about European masters, most likely, their flowers come from Kenya. This country is one of the largest producers and growers of fresh cut flowers in the world, in particular, roses. Kenyan farms produce many fresh flowers, however, roses take the biggest part of floral export, which is 80%. Even in times of economic crisis, which has captured the Europe in recent years, floriculture in Kenya keeps on actively develop. Despite a significant decline in the share of the Kenyan flower products in European exports, the business of green plantations in Kenya keeps on prosper due to the introduction of environmental solutions, which enable to reduce the cost of expenses.

The main farms and plantations, where Kenyan roses bear, are located between two large lakes Nakuru and Naivasha. Names of these lakes are needed to be said together and mean the whole region. The region is a big part of Great Rift Valley. By the way, except lakes and agriculture lands, the region also has a lot of volcanic formations, some of which are even active volcanoes. The Valley is divided into a few sectors which are included in the national parks of Kenya.

In Kenya, plantations of roses can be easily distinguished by greenhouses covered with polyethylene. The greenhouses have several purposes. Just grafted roses need protection from a bad weather. Hard rain, the wind and direct sunlight can hurt these sensitive flowers. The temperature in the greenhouse always needs to be stable, so it’s necessary that cool air could easily fill the greenhouse when hot hair could be removed.

Symmetrical rows of young plants that are on the different growth stages can be seen on the Kenyan flower farms plantations. The variety of rose sorts can be cultivated there, from ones that have 70cm in length to the small roses. Up to 70 thousands of plants can grow in only one hectare of plantations.

 

Process and specific of growing flowers in Kenya

How do flowers receive nutrients? A usual soil is not used here. Polyethylene is laid at the base of the bed, which is sprinkled with holystone (kind of volcanic rock) on top. This way there is no need to fight with soil diseases anymore. Flowers are watered with the help of method of drip irrigation. Due to special ducts, connected with beds, plants get water and nutrients in right those amounts, which are necessary for their growing. Water seeps through the pores of volcanic rock on the polyethylene and afterwards is gathered for the secondary use.

Flower cultivating requires a big amount of water and other resources. Their usage, in fact, causes some damage to the environment. However, Kenyan farmers and gardeners have found an honorable way out of this situation.  They gather the rainwater, build factories for the processing of organic waste, which is then used as a fertilizer. Every time, Kenyan flower farmers also look for the ways to save costs on expensive pesticides.

Some farmers use hydroponic methods of water processing. This way, this water can be secondly used for watering, for example, cereals.  Other floral facilities use geometric of hydroelectric energy for heating greenhouses, where the roses grow.  These methods allow to save the natural sources and provide floriculture industry in Kenya a comfortable existence in the conditions of economic crisis.

Floriculture industry in Kenya is third in sizes state budget donor, after tourism and tea export.  Every year this country exports to European countries cut flowers of total value about 500 million of USA dollars. One of world´s largest green farms are located in this country. At some of them, more than ten thousands of farm workers take care of the flowers day after day. Nowadays, Kenyan farmers try to get their place on the flower market in Asia. They are truly considered that their floral products have a bright and reliable future there and there are no reasons to doubt it.

 

HELLS GATE NATIONAL PARK

Hells Gate National park covers an area of 68.25km square and is situated in the environs of lake

Naivasha about 90 km from Nairobi.

It is characterised by its dense topography and Geological scenery.

It is an important home of the Bearded Vulture.

Hells gate is also a home to several Gazelles,Zebras,Buffalloes and Hyraxes.

Here guests either do walking safari or ride on Bicycles!!.

 

.

game reserve in NarokKenya, contiguous with the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. It is named in honor of the Maasai people, the ancestral inhabitants of the area, who migrated to the area from the Nile Basin. Their description of the area when looked at from afar: “Mara” means “spotted” in the local Maasai language, due to the many short bushy trees which dot the landscape.

Maasai Mara is one of the most famous and important wildlife conservation and wilderness areas in Africa, world-renowned for its exceptional populations of lionAfrican leopardcheetah and African bush elephant. It also hosts the Great Migration, which secured it as one of the Seven Natural Wonders of Africa, and as one of the ten Wonders of the World.

The Greater Mara ecosystem encompasses areas known as the Maasai Mara National Reserve, the Mara Triangle, and several Maasai Conservancies, including Koiyaki, Lemek, Ol Chorro Oirowua, Mara North, Olkinyei, Siana, Maji Moto, Naikara, Ol Derkesi, Kerinkani, Oloirien, and Kimintet.

When it was originally established in 1961 as a wildlife sanctuary the Mara covered only 520 km2 (200 sq mi) of the current area, including the Mara Triangle. The area was extended to the east in 1961 to cover 1,821 km2 (703 sq mi) and converted to a game reserve. The Narok County Council (NCC) took over management of the reserve at this time. Part of the reserve was given National Reserve status in 1974, and the remaining area of 159 km2 (61 sq mi) was returned to local communities. An additional 162 km2 (63 sq mi) were removed from the reserve in 1976, and the park was reduced to 1,510 km2 (580 sq mi) in 1984.[2]

In 1994, the TransMara County Council (TMCC) was formed in the western part of the reserve, and control was divided between the new council and the existing Narok County Council. In May 2001, the not-for-profit Mara Conservancy took over management of the Mara Triangle.[2]

The Maasai people make up a community that spans across northern, central and southern Kenya and northern parts of Tanzania. As pastoralists, the community holds the belief that they own all of the cattle in the world. The Maasai rely off of their lands to sustain their cattle, as well as themselves and their families. Prior to the establishment of the reserve as a protected area for the conservation of wildlife and wilderness, the Maasai were forced to move out of their native lands.

Tradition continues to play a major role in the lives of modern day Maasai people, who are known for their tall stature, patterned shukas and beadwork. It is estimated that there are approximately half a million individuals[3] that speak the Maa language and this number includes not only the Maasai but also Samburu and Camus people in Kenya.

View of Mara River

Sunrise over Maasai Mara National Reserve

The total area under conservation in the Greater Maasai Mara ecosystem amounts to almost 1,510 km2 (580 sq mi).[1] It is the northernmost section of the Mara-Serengeti ecosystem, which covers some 25,000 km2 (9,700 sq mi) in Tanzania and Kenya. It is bounded by the Serengeti Park to the south, the Siria / Oloololo escarpment to the west, and Maasai pastoral ranches to the north, east and west. Rainfall in the ecosystem increases markedly along a southeast–northwest gradient, varies in space and time, and is markedly bimodal. The Sand, Talek River and Mara River are the major rivers draining the reserve. Shrubs and trees fringe most drainage lines and cover hillslopes and hilltops.

The terrain of the reserve is primarily open grassland with seasonal riverlets. In the south-east region are clumps of the distinctive acacia tree. The western border is the Esoit (Siria) Escarpment of the East African Rift, which is a system of rifts some 5,600 km (3,500 mi) long, from Ethiopia’s Red Sea through Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi and into Mozambique. Wildlife tends to be most concentrated here, as the swampy ground means that access to water is always good, while tourist disruption is minimal. The easternmost border is 224 km (139.2 mi) from Nairobi, and hence it is the eastern regions which are most visited by tourists.

It has a semi-arid climate with biannual rains and two distinct rainy seasons. Local farmers have referred to these as the ‘long rains’ which last approximately six to eight weeks in April and May and the ‘short rains’ in November and December which last approximately four weeks.

Elevation: 1,500–2,180 m (4,920–7,150 ft); Rainfall: 83 mm (3.3 in)/month; Temperature range: 12–30 °C (54–86 °F)

A scene with scattered bushes, animals, cloud shadows, and umbrella acacia trees

Aerial view of a herd of wildebeest following a few leading zebras

East African cheetah with cubs

Wildebeesttopizebra, and Thomson’s gazelle migrate into and occupy the Mara reserve, from the Serengeti plains to the south and Loita Plains in the pastoral ranches to the north-east, from July to October or later. Herds of all three species are also resident in the reserve.

All members of the “Big Five” (lionleopardelephantCape buffaloblack and white rhinos) are found here all year round.[4] The population of black rhinos was fairly numerous until 1960, but it was severely depleted by poaching in the 1970s and early 1980s, dropping to a low of 15 individuals. Numbers have been slowly increasing, but the population was still only up to an estimated 23 in 1999.[5] The Maasai Mara is the only protected area in Kenya with an indigenous black rhino population, unaffected by translocations, and due to its size, is able to support one of the largest populations in Africa.[6]

Hippopotami and crocodiles are found in large groups in the Mara and Talek rivers. Hyenascheetahsjackalsservals and bat-eared foxes can also be found in the reserve.[7] The plains between the Mara River and the Esoit Siria Escarpment are probably the best area for game viewing, in particular regarding lion and cheetah.

Wildebeest are the dominant inhabitants of the Maasai Mara, and their numbers are estimated in the millions. Around July of each year, these animals migrate north from the Serengeti plains in search of fresh pasture, and return to the south around October. The Great Migration is one of the most impressive natural events worldwide, involving some 1,300,000 blue wildebeest, 500,000 Thomson’s gazelles, 97,000 Topi, 18,000 common elands, and 200,000 Grant’s zebras.[8]

Antelopes can be found, including Grant’s gazelles, impalasduikers and Coke’s hartebeests. The plains are also home to the distinctive Masai giraffe. The large roan antelope and the nocturnal bat-eared fox, rarely present elsewhere in Kenya, can be seen within the reserve borders.

More than 470 species of birds have been identified in the park, many of which are migrants, with almost 60 species being raptors.[9] Birds that call this area home for at least part of the year include: vulturesmarabou storkssecretary birdshornbillscrowned cranesostricheslong-crested eaglesAfrican pygmy-falcons and the lilac-breasted roller, which is the national bird of Kenya.

The Maasai Mara is administered by the Narok County government. The more visited eastern part of the park known as the Maasai Mara National Reserve is managed by the Narok County Council. The Mara Triangle in the western part is managed by the Trans-Mara county council, which has contracted management to the Mara Conservancy since the early 2000s.[10]

The outer areas are conservancies that are administered by Group Ranch Trusts of the Maasai community, although this approach has been criticised for benefitting just a few powerful individuals rather than the majority of landowners.[11] Although there has been a rise in fencing on private land in recent years,[12] the wildlife roam freely across both the reserve and conservancies.

The Maasai Mara is a major research centre for the spotted hyena. With two field offices in the Mara, the Michigan State University based Kay E. Holekamp Lab studies the behaviour and physiology of this predator, as well as doing comparison studies between large predators in the Mara Triangle and their counterparts in the eastern part of the Mara.[13]

A flow assessment and trans-boundary river basin management plan between Kenya and Tanzania was completed for the river to sustain the ecosystem and the basic needs of 1 million people who depend on its water.[14]

The Mara Predator Project also operates in the Maasai Mara, cataloging and monitoring lion populations throughout the region.[15] Concentrating on the northern conservancies where communities coexist with wildlife, the project aims to identify population trends and responses to changes in land management, human settlements, livestock movements and tourism.

Since October 2012, the Mara-Meru Cheetah Project[16] has worked in the Mara monitoring cheetah population, estimating population status and dynamics, and evaluating the predator impact and human activity on cheetah behavior and survival. The head of the Project, Elena Chelysheva, was working in 2001–2002 as Assistant Researcher at the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) Maasai-Mara Cheetah Conservation Project. At that time, she developed original method of cheetah identification based on visual analysis of the unique spot patterns on front limbs (from toes to shoulder) and hind limbs (from toes to the hip), and spots and rings on the tail.[17] Collected over the years, photographic data allows the project team to trace kinship between generations and build Mara cheetah pedigree. The data collected helps to reveal parental relationship between individuals, survival rate of cubs, cheetah lifespan and personal reproductive history.

Sekenani Gate

A hot air balloon safari

The Maasai Mara is one of the most famous safari destinations in Africa.[18] Entry fees are currently US$ 70 for adult non-East African Residents per 24 hours (if staying at a property inside the Reserve) or US$ 80 if outside the reserve, and $40 for children.[19] There are a number of lodges and tented camps catering for tourists inside or bordering the Reserve and within the various separate Conservancies which border the main reserve. However, the main reserve is unfenced even along the border with Serengeti (Tanzania) which means there is free movement of wildlife throughout the ecosystem.

Although one third of the whole Maasai Mara in the western part if the larger reserve, The Mara Triangle has only two permanent lodges within its boundaries, namely the Mara Serena Lodge and Little Governors Camp (compared to the numerous camps and lodges on the Narok side) and has well maintained, all weather gravel roads. The rangers patrol regularly which means that there is less poaching and excellent game viewing. There is also strict control over vehicle numbers around animal sightings, allowing for a better experience when out on a game drive. Most lodges within the region charge higher rates during the Migration season, although the Maasai Mara is home to prolific wildlife year-round.

There are several airfields which serve the camps and lodges in the Maasai Mara, including Mara Serena Airstrip, Musiara Airstrip and Keekorok, Kichwa Tembo, Ngerende Airport, Ol Kiombo and Angama Mara Airstrips, and several airlines such as SafariLink and AirKenya fly scheduled services from Nairobi and elsewhere multiple times a day. Helicopter flights over the reserve are limited to a minimum height of 1,500 ft.

Game drives are the most popular activity in the Maasai Mara, but other activities include hot air ballooning, nature walks, photographic safaris and cultural experiences.

Big Cat Diary[edit]

Main article: Big Cat Diary

The BBC Television show titled “Big Cat Diary” was filmed in the Maasai Mara. The show followed the lives of the big cats living in the reserve. The show highlighted scenes from the Reserve’s Musiara marsh area and the Leopard Gorge, the Fig Tree Ridge areas and the Mara River, separating the Serengeti and the Maasai Mara.[citation needed]

Hot air balloons over Maasai Mara at sunrise

 

Male lion

 

African leopard climbing down a tree

 

African bush elephants

 

 

Wildebeest with zebras in distance

 

Spotted hyenas with an impala carcass and two vultures

 

Maasai Mara

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Maasai Mara National Reserve
Typical “spotted” Maasai Mara scenery
Location of Maasai Mara National Reserve
Location KenyaRift Valley Province
Nearest town Narok
Coordinates 1°29′24″S 35°8′38″ECoordinates1°29′24″S 35°8′38″E
Area 1,510 km2 (580 sq mi)[1]

Maasai Mara, also sometimes spelled Masai Mara and locally known simply as The Mara, is a large national game reserve in NarokKenya, contiguous with the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. It is named in honor of the Maasai people, the ancestral inhabitants of the area, who migrated to the area from the Nile Basin. Their description of the area when looked at from afar: “Mara” means “spotted” in the local Maasai language, due to the many short bushy trees which dot the landscape.

Maasai Mara is one of the most famous and important wildlife conservation and wilderness areas in Africa, world-renowned for its exceptional populations of lionAfrican leopardcheetah and African bush elephant. It also hosts the Great Migration, which secured it as one of the Seven Natural Wonders of Africa, and as one of the ten Wonders of the World.

The Greater Mara ecosystem encompasses areas known as the Maasai Mara National Reserve, the Mara Triangle, and several Maasai Conservancies, including Koiyaki, Lemek, Ol Chorro Oirowua, Mara North, Olkinyei, Siana, Maji Moto, Naikara, Ol Derkesi, Kerinkani, Oloirien, and Kimintet.

When it was originally established in 1961 as a wildlife sanctuary the Mara covered only 520 km2 (200 sq mi) of the current area, including the Mara Triangle. The area was extended to the east in 1961 to cover 1,821 km2 (703 sq mi) and converted to a game reserve. The Narok County Council (NCC) took over management of the reserve at this time. Part of the reserve was given National Reserve status in 1974, and the remaining area of 159 km2 (61 sq mi) was returned to local communities. An additional 162 km2 (63 sq mi) were removed from the reserve in 1976, and the park was reduced to 1,510 km2 (580 sq mi) in 1984.[2]

In 1994, the TransMara County Council (TMCC) was formed in the western part of the reserve, and control was divided between the new council and the existing Narok County Council. In May 2001, the not-for-profit Mara Conservancy took over management of the Mara Triangle.[2]

The Maasai people make up a community that spans across northern, central and southern Kenya and northern parts of Tanzania. As pastoralists, the community holds the belief that they own all of the cattle in the world. The Maasai rely off of their lands to sustain their cattle, as well as themselves and their families. Prior to the establishment of the reserve as a protected area for the conservation of wildlife and wilderness, the Maasai were forced to move out of their native lands.

Tradition continues to play a major role in the lives of modern day Maasai people, who are known for their tall stature, patterned shukas and beadwork. It is estimated that there are approximately half a million individuals[3] that speak the Maa language and this number includes not only the Maasai but also Samburu and Camus people in Kenya.

View of Mara River

Sunrise over Maasai Mara National Reserve

The total area under conservation in the Greater Maasai Mara ecosystem amounts to almost 1,510 km2 (580 sq mi).[1] It is the northernmost section of the Mara-Serengeti ecosystem, which covers some 25,000 km2 (9,700 sq mi) in Tanzania and Kenya. It is bounded by the Serengeti Park to the south, the Siria / Oloololo escarpment to the west, and Maasai pastoral ranches to the north, east and west. Rainfall in the ecosystem increases markedly along a southeast–northwest gradient, varies in space and time, and is markedly bimodal. The Sand, Talek River and Mara River are the major rivers draining the reserve. Shrubs and trees fringe most drainage lines and cover hillslopes and hilltops.

The terrain of the reserve is primarily open grassland with seasonal riverlets. In the south-east region are clumps of the distinctive acacia tree. The western border is the Esoit (Siria) Escarpment of the East African Rift, which is a system of rifts some 5,600 km (3,500 mi) long, from Ethiopia’s Red Sea through Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi and into Mozambique. Wildlife tends to be most concentrated here, as the swampy ground means that access to water is always good, while tourist disruption is minimal. The easternmost border is 224 km (139.2 mi) from Nairobi, and hence it is the eastern regions which are most visited by tourists.

It has a semi-arid climate with biannual rains and two distinct rainy seasons. Local farmers have referred to these as the ‘long rains’ which last approximately six to eight weeks in April and May and the ‘short rains’ in November and December which last approximately four weeks.

Elevation: 1,500–2,180 m (4,920–7,150 ft); Rainfall: 83 mm (3.3 in)/month; Temperature range: 12–30 °C (54–86 °F)

A scene with scattered bushes, animals, cloud shadows, and umbrella acacia trees

Aerial view of a herd of wildebeest following a few leading zebras

East African cheetah with cubs

Wildebeesttopizebra, and Thomson’s gazelle migrate into and occupy the Mara reserve, from the Serengeti plains to the south and Loita Plains in the pastoral ranches to the north-east, from July to October or later. Herds of all three species are also resident in the reserve.

All members of the “Big Five” (lionleopardelephantCape buffaloblack and white rhinos) are found here all year round.[4] The population of black rhinos was fairly numerous until 1960, but it was severely depleted by poaching in the 1970s and early 1980s, dropping to a low of 15 individuals. Numbers have been slowly increasing, but the population was still only up to an estimated 23 in 1999.[5] The Maasai Mara is the only protected area in Kenya with an indigenous black rhino population, unaffected by translocations, and due to its size, is able to support one of the largest populations in Africa.[6]

Hippopotami and crocodiles are found in large groups in the Mara and Talek rivers. Hyenascheetahsjackalsservals and bat-eared foxes can also be found in the reserve.[7] The plains between the Mara River and the Esoit Siria Escarpment are probably the best area for game viewing, in particular regarding lion and cheetah.

Wildebeest are the dominant inhabitants of the Maasai Mara, and their numbers are estimated in the millions. Around July of each year, these animals migrate north from the Serengeti plains in search of fresh pasture, and return to the south around October. The Great Migration is one of the most impressive natural events worldwide, involving some 1,300,000 blue wildebeest, 500,000 Thomson’s gazelles, 97,000 Topi, 18,000 common elands, and 200,000 Grant’s zebras.[8]

Antelopes can be found, including Grant’s gazelles, impalasduikers and Coke’s hartebeests. The plains are also home to the distinctive Masai giraffe. The large roan antelope and the nocturnal bat-eared fox, rarely present elsewhere in Kenya, can be seen within the reserve borders.

More than 470 species of birds have been identified in the park, many of which are migrants, with almost 60 species being raptors.[9] Birds that call this area home for at least part of the year include: vulturesmarabou storkssecretary birdshornbillscrowned cranesostricheslong-crested eaglesAfrican pygmy-falcons and the lilac-breasted roller, which is the national bird of Kenya.

The Maasai Mara is administered by the Narok County government. The more visited eastern part of the park known as the Maasai Mara National Reserve is managed by the Narok County Council. The Mara Triangle in the western part is managed by the Trans-Mara county council, which has contracted management to the Mara Conservancy since the early 2000s.[10]

The outer areas are conservancies that are administered by Group Ranch Trusts of the Maasai community, although this approach has been criticised for benefitting just a few powerful individuals rather than the majority of landowners.[11] Although there has been a rise in fencing on private land in recent years,[12] the wildlife roam freely across both the reserve and conservancies.

The Maasai Mara is a major research centre for the spotted hyena. With two field offices in the Mara, the Michigan State University based Kay E. Holekamp Lab studies the behaviour and physiology of this predator, as well as doing comparison studies between large predators in the Mara Triangle and their counterparts in the eastern part of the Mara.[13]

A flow assessment and trans-boundary river basin management plan between Kenya and Tanzania was completed for the river to sustain the ecosystem and the basic needs of 1 million people who depend on its water.[14]

The Mara Predator Project also operates in the Maasai Mara, cataloging and monitoring lion populations throughout the region.[15] Concentrating on the northern conservancies where communities coexist with wildlife, the project aims to identify population trends and responses to changes in land management, human settlements, livestock movements and tourism.

Since October 2012, the Mara-Meru Cheetah Project[16] has worked in the Mara monitoring cheetah population, estimating population status and dynamics, and evaluating the predator impact and human activity on cheetah behavior and survival. The head of the Project, Elena Chelysheva, was working in 2001–2002 as Assistant Researcher at the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) Maasai-Mara Cheetah Conservation Project. At that time, she developed original method of cheetah identification based on visual analysis of the unique spot patterns on front limbs (from toes to shoulder) and hind limbs (from toes to the hip), and spots and rings on the tail.[17] Collected over the years, photographic data allows the project team to trace kinship between generations and build Mara cheetah pedigree. The data collected helps to reveal parental relationship between individuals, survival rate of cubs, cheetah lifespan and personal reproductive history.

Sekenani Gate

A hot air balloon safari

The Maasai Mara is one of the most famous safari destinations in Africa.[18] Entry fees are currently US$ 70 for adult non-East African Residents per 24 hours (if staying at a property inside the Reserve) or US$ 80 if outside the reserve, and $40 for children.[19] There are a number of lodges and tented camps catering for tourists inside or bordering the Reserve and within the various separate Conservancies which border the main reserve. However, the main reserve is unfenced even along the border with Serengeti (Tanzania) which means there is free movement of wildlife throughout the ecosystem.

Although one third of the whole Maasai Mara in the western part if the larger reserve, The Mara Triangle has only two permanent lodges within its boundaries, namely the Mara Serena Lodge and Little Governors Camp (compared to the numerous camps and lodges on the Narok side) and has well maintained, all weather gravel roads. The rangers patrol regularly which means that there is less poaching and excellent game viewing. There is also strict control over vehicle numbers around animal sightings, allowing for a better experience when out on a game drive. Most lodges within the region charge higher rates during the Migration season, although the Maasai Mara is home to prolific wildlife year-round.

There are several airfields which serve the camps and lodges in the Maasai Mara, including Mara Serena Airstrip, Musiara Airstrip and Keekorok, Kichwa Tembo, Ngerende Airport, Ol Kiombo and Angama Mara Airstrips, and several airlines such as SafariLink and AirKenya fly scheduled services from Nairobi and elsewhere multiple times a day. Helicopter flights over the reserve are limited to a minimum height of 1,500 ft.

Game drives are the most popular activity in the Maasai Mara, but other activities include hot air ballooning, nature walks, photographic safaris and cultural experiences.

Big Cat Diary[edit]

Main article: Big Cat Diary

The BBC Television show titled “Big Cat Diary” was filmed in the Maasai Mara. The show followed the lives of the big cats living in the reserve. The show highlighted scenes from the Reserve’s Musiara marsh area and the Leopard Gorge, the Fig Tree Ridge areas and the Mara River, separating the Serengeti and the Maasai Mara.[citation needed]

Hot air balloons over Maasai Mara at sunrise

 

Male lion

 

African leopard climbing down a tree

 

African bush elephants

 

 

Wildebeest with zebras in distance

 

Spotted hyenas with an impala carcass and two vultures

 

Storm gathering